Registered Offenders in a Health Care Facility

Emergency Room

Prior to admission to a health care facility, 9 a person required to register must inform the health care facility employee processing the admission that he or she is a registered predatory offender. The person also must notify his or her corrections agent, or if the person does not have one, the law enforcement authority with whom the person is currently required to register, that inpatient admission will occur.

When a law enforcement authority or corrections agent receives such notice or otherwise knows that a person required to register is planning to be, or has been, admitted to a health care facility, they must notify the administrator of the facility and deliver a fact sheet to the administrator. The fact sheet must contain the name and physical description of the offender, the offender’s conviction history (including dates of conviction), the risk-level classification assigned to the offender, and the profile of likely victims.

If a health care facility, other than a hospital, receives a fact sheet that includes a risk classification for the offender, and the facility admits the offender, then the facility must distribute the fact sheet to all residents at the facility. If the facility determines that distribution to a resident is not appropriate given the resident’s medical, emotional, or mental status, the facility must distribute the fact sheet to the patient’s next of kin or emergency contact. Minn. Stat. § 243.166, subd. 4b.

9 A “health care facility” is a facility licensed by the commissioner of health as a hospital, boarding care home, supervised living facility, or nursing home; or a facility licensed by the commissioner of human services as a residential facility to provide adult foster care, adult mental health treatment, chemical dependency treatment to adults, or residential services to persons with developmental disabilities; or a facility registered as a housing with services establishment. Minn. Stat. § 243.166, subd. 4b.

CREDIT: The content of this and any related posts has been copied or adopted from the Minnesota House of Representatives Research Department’s Information Brief, Sex Offenders and Predatory Offenders: Minnesota Criminal and Civil Regulatory Laws, written by Legislative Analyst Jeffrey Diebel.
This post is part of a series of posts on Minnesota Criminal and Civil Regulatory Laws Regarding Sex Offenders and Predatory Offenders.