Minnesota Labor Laws

Labor laws are monitored by the U.S. Department of Labor. Labor laws vary from State to State. Below you will find laws that apply to Minnesota.

Minimum Wage

For a large employer (companies with annual receipts of $500,000 or more) minimum wage is $8.00. For a small employer (companies with annual receipts of less than $500,000) minimum wage is $6.50. Minimum wage also applies to employers of tipped employees in Minnesota.

Child Labor Laws

Non-Agricultural Employees

Children under the age of 16 can work a maximum of eight hours a day and 40 hours a week. Children under the age of 16 are prohibited from working between the hours of 9:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. Children age 16-17 are prohibited from working between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m.

Agricultural Employees

The minimum age for agricultural employees during school hours is 16; outside of school hours the minimum age is 12. Night work between the hours of 9:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. is prohibited for minors under the age of 16.

Child Entertainment

Minnesota regulates child entertainment and requires a work permit. Minnesota Statute 181A.07 states “minors are subject to the child labor law except for the minimum age provisions. The labor Commissioner may issue waivers from the hours limitations.”

Paid Rest Period

Minnesota Statute 177.253 states that employers must provide employees a paid rest period within each four consecutive hours a week to utilize the nearest convenient restroom. This Statute does not apply to certain agricultural and seasonal employees, or collective bargaining agreements.

Employers do not have to pay employees for meal periods. They do however, have to provide sufficient unpaid time to employees who work eight or more consecutive hours. This does not apply to certain agricultural and seasonal employees, or collective bargaining agreements.

Labor laws can be very complex. An audit by the Minnesota Labor Commissioner can cost your business thousands of dollars. An experienced employment attorney can take a look at your business and employee handbook and implement policies to protect your company from lawsuits.