Environmental Protection Programs Minnesota – Generators

Generators

Very Small Quantity Generators (VSQG)

If less than 220 pounds (or 100 kilograms) of hazardous waste is generated each month, the generator can accumulate up to 2,200 pounds (1,000 kg) indefinitely. Once this amount (about four drums of liquid) has accumulated, the generator has 180 days to have it transported off-site to a storage, treatment, or disposal facility within 200 miles. If the designated facility is farther away than 200 miles, the generator has an additional 90 days to ship the waste.

A sub-classification of VSQGs is MQGs, which generate 100 pounds (about 10 gallons liquid) or less of hazardous waste per year. However, if any acute hazardous waste is generated, the MGQ classification can not be applied. The generator can accumulate up to 550 pounds indefinitely. Once this amount (about one 55 gallon container) has accumulated, the generator has 75 days to have it transported off-site. The MPCA does not require MQGs to apply for a license, however metropolitan counties may. Some counties do not recognize the MQG classification.

Small Quantity Generators (SQG)

If between 220 and 2,200 pounds (or 100 to 1,000 kilograms) of hazardous waste is generated each month, the generator must ship the waste to a storage, treatment, or disposal facility within 180 days of the accumulation start date, provided the receiving facility is within 200 miles. If the facility is farther away than 200 miles, the generator has 270 days to ship the waste.

Large Quantity Generators (LQG)

If more than 2,200 pounds (1,000 kg) of hazardous waste is generated each month, the generator must ship all accumulated hazardous waste off-site to a storage, treatment, or disposal facility within 90 days of the accumulation start date. If the 90-day deadline is not met, the generator must obtain a hazardous-waste storage facility permit.

Licenses

Licenses must be renewed annually and fees are based on the amount of hazardous waste generated and the disposal method. Permit fees are also assessed if generators need an MPCA permit for their waste treatment, storage or disposal activities. For more information contact the MPCA or the metropolitan county hazardous-waste office.

It is the generator’s responsibility to know the rules that apply to the management of a particular hazardous waste. Copies of the hazardous-waste rules can be obtained from the Minnesota Bookstore at the address and telephone number listed in the Resource Directory section of this Guide.


CREDITS: This is an excerpt from A Guide to Starting a Business in Minnesota, provided by the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, Small Business Assistance Office, Twenty-eighth Edition, January 2010, written by Charles A. Schaffer, Madeline Harris, and Mark Simmer. Copies are available without charge from the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, Small Business Assistance Office.

This post is also part of a series of posts on Minnesota Environmental Protection Programs and how they affect starting a business in Minnesota.